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Modernisation

One of the most important aims of the foundation is to provide visitors to the individual museums with the best possible quality of stay through high-quality exhibitions, innovative event formats and modern, barrier-free facilities. This will require a series of modernisation measures in the coming years which will include both structural and conceptual improvements.

Modernising the Museum for Hamburg History

A total of 36 million Euros has been set aside to modernise the Museum for Hamburg History over the next few years. With the help of Federal Government funding, the Historic Museums Hamburg Foundation can now get started on a full scale modernisation of the Museum for Hamburg History. Other funds have also been promised by the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg, so it will also be possible to start planning the conceptual modernisation of the largest urban history museum in Germany.

Founded in 1908 and constructed between 1914 and 1922 by Fritz Schumacher, the Museum for Hamburg History showcases the history of the urban and cultural development of the city of Hamburg from its beginnings in around the year 800 to the present day. It is the largest of the Foundation’s museums and one of the largest museums of urban history in Europe.

Exterior view from the east: The Museum of Hamburg History, built 1914 - 1922 by Fritz Schumacher. Photo Sinje Hasheider/SHMH.
Exterior view from the east: The Museum of Hamburg History, built 1914 - 1922 by Fritz Schumacher. Photo Sinje Hasheider/SHMH.

So as to ensure that this well-established museum with its unique collection continues to do justice to its role as an important, modern and trendsetting place for remembering the history of Hamburg, plans are in place to modify and upgrade the permanent exhibition which relates Hamburg’s history and to open up the building in the direction of the Planten un Blomen park.

Funds for the Museum of Work and the Jenisch House

In June 2018, the Federal Government approved financial support for two further important modernisation projects of the Historic Museums Hamburg Foundation: The structural and content redesign of the Museum of Work with 10 million euros and that of the Jenisch House with 8 million euros. A total of 36 million euros is budgeted for the renovation and modernisation of the two museums. The rest of the required funds will also be raised for these projects from the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg. With the fundamental renewal of the two museums, two further important steps can be taken in the development of the Historic Museums Hamburg Foundation into a modern and attractive museum network for broad sections of the population.

Plans for the Torhaus (Design: Sibylle Kramer Architekten, Realisation: Sprinkenhof GmbH)
Plans for the Torhaus (Design: Sibylle Kramer Architekten, Realisation: Sprinkenhof GmbH)
Staircase of the Jenisch House, built between 1831 and 1834 in classicist style according to designs by Franz Gustav Forsmann and Karl Friedrich Schinkel. Photo Sinje Hasheider/SHMH.
Staircase of the Jenisch House, built between 1831 and 1834 in classicist style according to designs by Franz Gustav Forsmann and Karl Friedrich Schinkel. Photo Sinje Hasheider/SHMH.

Development boost for the Altonaer Museum

The Altona Museum was founded in 1863 as the
The Altona Museum was founded in 1863 as the "Public Museum", when Altona, together with the duchies of Holstein, Schleswig and Lauenburg, still belonged to the Danish state. Photo Sinje Hasheider/SHMH

The renovation and modernisation of the Altona Museum has also been secured thanks to a decision by the Budget Committee of the German Bundestag in November 2018. 19.5 million was made available by the Federal Government for the necessary measures, which are to be supplemented by the same contribution from funds of the Free and Hanseatic City of Hamburg. The total of 39.5 million euros is intended to enable a general redesign of the exhibition facilities and universal accessibility. Individual chapters of the permanent exhibition, some of which date back to the first decades after the opening of the museum, are to be completely revised and devoted to current and future questions of social coexistence given the background of the history of Altona and northern Germany.