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Freedom Of FaithGranted and demanded - since 1601

30 October 2020 - 21 June 2021

We have the freedom to believe what we want, as well as the freedom not to believe anything at all. Freedom of religion is a human right and is anchored in the Basic Law, Germany’s constitution. People still struggle for this right every day and it affects people’s lives in areas as diverse as architecture, schools, and funeral rites. This special exhibition invites the public to enter in a dialogue on the past and present of religious freedoms that have been demanded, granted, bestowed, and achieved. After all, freedom of faith has been a tradition in Altona since 1601. 

 

By the end of the 16th century, the independent city of Altona stood in contrast to Hamburg, where only the Lutheran faith was permitted. Altona’s history is reflected in two street names, “Große Freiheit” (Great Freedom) and “Kleine Freiheit” (Small Freedom), which belonged to Altona until 1938. Here, religious minorities could build places of worship and establish cemeteries. Today’s Hamburg is a religiously diverse and, at the same time, an increasingly secular society. Looking at a period from the end of the 16th century to the present day, the exhibition presents the developments and issues surrounding a fundamental right. 

 

Given the unique history of Altona, the exhibition examines the situation in contemporary Hamburg. In more than 50 video-interviews inhabitants of Hamburger talk about their faiths and the relevance of the freedom of faiths in their everyday lives.  

Opening hours

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Mondays 10 - 17 

TUESDAYS CLOSED

Wednesdays to Fridays 10 - 17

Saturdays and Sundays 10 - 18

Image

Freedom Of FaithGranted and demanded - since 1601

30 October 2020 - 21 June 2021

We have the freedom to believe what we want, as well as the freedom not to believe anything at all. Freedom of religion is a human right and is anchored in the Basic Law, Germany’s constitution. People still struggle for this right every day and it affects people’s lives in areas as diverse as architecture, schools, and funeral rites. This special exhibition invites the public to enter in a dialogue on the past and present of religious freedoms that have been demanded, granted, bestowed, and achieved. After all, freedom of faith has been a tradition in Altona since 1601. 

 

By the end of the 16th century, the independent city of Altona stood in contrast to Hamburg, where only the Lutheran faith was permitted. Altona’s history is reflected in two street names, “Große Freiheit” (Great Freedom) and “Kleine Freiheit” (Small Freedom), which belonged to Altona until 1938. Here, religious minorities could build places of worship and establish cemeteries. Today’s Hamburg is a religiously diverse and, at the same time, an increasingly secular society. Looking at a period from the end of the 16th century to the present day, the exhibition presents the developments and issues surrounding a fundamental right. 

 

Given the unique history of Altona, the exhibition examines the situation in contemporary Hamburg. In more than 50 video-interviews inhabitants of Hamburger talk about their faiths and the relevance of the freedom of faiths in their everyday lives.  

Opening hours

Activate map

Mondays 10 - 17 

TUESDAYS CLOSED

Wednesdays to Fridays 10 - 17

Saturdays and Sundays 10 - 18